Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Upcoming Events

March

April

May

Later in 2015

  • Liz Richardson - Manchester University
  • Associate Professor Tina Nabatchi - Maxwell School of Citizenbship and Public Affairs

 

March

LEGACY Father, Son and Nation:

Reflections on the Eichmann Trial

Amos Hausner was eleven when the Eichmann trial gripped Israel, the Jewish world and beyond. Old enough for such an event to leave an indelible mark and even more so when your father is the Attorney General and prosecutor, and key witnesses break their silence and descend upon your family home to tell their stories.

 

The Eichmann trial exposed genocide on a large scale. It shocked the world with the precision and the brutality and gave faces and voice to the sufferings of ordinary people. Legally it highlighted universal jurisdiction and was pivotal in the creation of the International Criminal Court. There were also legal issues of impartiality, the argument of "following orders" and the defence of  an "Act of State".

 

Amos Hausner followed his father into the law and carved a successful legal career in his own right creating precedents inconstitutional, criminal, civil and administrative law.

 

He continues to take the messages of the Eichmann trial around the world. Now on holiday in New Zealand, he has kindly agreed to address audiences on the Eichmann trial and other pressing issues.

Speaker:

Amos Hausner

Former Supreme Court Judge and Attorney General of the World Zionist Organisation, Current Board Member of the Massuah Institute for the study of the Holocaust and former member on Jerusalem's Hebrew University Disciplinary Tribunal

Date:

Friday 27 March

5.30pm - 6.30pm

Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1), Old Government Buildings

RSVP Essential - RSVP HERE

 

Nuclear Weapons:

The State of Play 2015

Five years ago hopes were high that the world was at last seriously headed towards nuclear disarmament. By the end of 2012, however, as reported in the inaugural State of Play report, much of this sense of optimism had evaporated. By the end of 2014, the fading optimism had given way to pessimism.

 

New START was signed and ratified, but the treaty left stockpiles intact and disagreements about missile defence and conventional-arms imbalances unresolved. Nuclear weapons numbers have decreased overall but increased in Asia; nuclear-weapons programs in India, Pakistan and China have accelerated; North Korea has conducted three nuclear tests and the CTBT is yet to enter into force; and fissile material production is not yet banned. A comprehensive agreement on Iran eluded negotiators by the extended deadline of 24 November 2014 and the push for talks on a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the Middle East has stalled. Cyber-threats to nuclear weapons systems have intensified, outer space remains at risk of nuclearization, and the upsurge of geopolitical tensions over the crisis in Ukraine produced flawed conclusions about the folly of giving up nuclear weapons on the one hand, and open reminders about Russia’s substantial nuclear arsenal, on the other.

 

Against this sombre backdrop, Nuclear Weapons: The State of Play 2015 by Gareth Evans, Tanya Ogilvie-White and Ramesh Thakur, provides an authoritative advocacy tool for governments, organizations and individuals committed to achieving a safer and saner nuclear-weapon-free world in the lead-up to the Ninth NPT Review Conference in New York in April–May 2015

Speaker:

Ramesh Thakur

Former United Nations Assistant Secretary-General, ICISS Commissioner, co-author of The Responsibility to Protect doctrine (2001) and Director of the Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament, Australian National University

Date:

Monday 30 March

6.00pm - 8.00pm

Lecture Theatre 323, Hunter Building, Kelburn Parade, Victoria University of Wellington

April

The Business of Bribery:

A Public Debate on the Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Legislation Bill

The Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Legislation Bill is currently being examined by the Law and Order Select Committee (you can read all of the submitted evidence on the parliament website). One of the stated aims of the Bill is to update New Zealand legislation so that it will finally be able to ratify the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) and other international commitments.

 

But does the Bill go far enough … or does it go too far? Will it have punitive effects on business or will it enable New Zealand to enact international leadership in ethics and integrity?

 

Come and listen to both sides of the debate, and have your say on this crucial topic.

Speaker:

Michael Macaulay

Associate Professor in Public Management, Executive Editor for the International Journal ofc Public Administration and Director of the IGPS

Date:

Wednesday 15 April

5.30pm - 6.30pm

Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT4), Old Government Buildings

May

Domestic Violence in America:

A reconfigured legal response

Feminists fought hard for recognition that domestic violence was a crime and helped to conceive and build the civil and criminal justice response that now dominates the worldwide discourse on addressing domestic violence. But the decision to rely so heavily on the legal system as the primary systemic response to domestic violence in the United States has had serious unintended consequences for the men and women that come into contact with that system.

 

The legal system's response essentializes people subjected to abuse, utilizes overly restrictive definitions of domestic violence, inappropriately relies on separation to protect people subjected to abuse and restricts the autonomy of people subjected to abuse through the use of mandatory policies.

 

This talk will discuss those problems and imagine a reconfigured legal response to domestic violence.

Speaker:

Leigh Goodmark

Professor of Law, Francis King Carey School of Law, University of Maryland

Date:

Tuesday 5 May

5.30pm - 6.30pm

Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3), Rutherford House

Public Policy in the Sea:

Spatial Planning in the Hauraki Gulf

Public policy often struggles to effectively deal with complex issues involving multiple actors and regulatory agencies. In the environmental sphere, such situations are common, particularly when it comes to marine management.

 

The inadequacy of New Zealand's ocean governance arrangements has been recognised for well over a decade but progress to address this has been very slow. There have been more promising developments at a regional level, the most recent being the Seachange Tai Timu Tai Paru project currently underway in the Hauraki Gulf. This marine spatial planning project is breaking new ground in an endeavour to achieve a healthier marine environment that will deliver both public and private sector benefits.

 

Seachange has adopted a co-governance arrangement with half the representatives on the governance body comprising manawhenua. The process is also collaborative, with the statutory agencies handing over the role of developing the plan to an independently-chaired stakeholder working group. In addition, Seachange is embracing a fully integrated catchment-to-the-sea approach, addressing sediment and nutrient issues as well as the impacts and needs of activities such as fishing, aquaculture and tourism. The spatial plan (the first to be prepared in New Zealand) is well advanced and is due to be completed by June 2015.

 

This seminar will describe the current approach adopted in the Seachange project, its strengths and weaknesses, and applicability to broader marine management in New Zealand. It will also touch on institutional changes that may be required for the spatial plan to achieve its promise.

 

Raewyn Peart has published widely on coastal and marine governance issues and is currently a member of the Seachange Stakeholder Working Group.

Speaker:

Raewyn Peart

Policy Director for the Environmental Defence Society

Date:

Tuesday 12 May

5.30pm - 6.30pm

Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3), Rutherford House

Later in 2015

Note: To view the public lectures given earlier in 2014; many with lecture reviews, power point slides and video recordings, see here.


There are plenty of free public lectures planned for the remainder of 2014. Please visit this site again soon or subscribe to our online newsletter to receive complimentary email updates.

Unfamiliar with Pipitea Campus? See here for an aerial view and a downloadable PDF map.