Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Upcoming Events

April

May

Later in 2015

  • Liz Richardson - Manchester University
  • Associate Professor Tina Nabatchi - Maxwell School of Citizenbship and Public Affairs

April

The Family Group Conference:

Working Together

The face of the Youth Justice Family Group Conference is changing after 25 years.

 

The changes, which reflect a better understanding of what drives offending behaviour, are encouraging an increased focus on agencies, families and community providers working together.

 

This in turn is being mirrored within the Justice sector where government agencies are finding new ways to cooperate at all levels and partner with communities in the pursuit of reducing youth crime.

Speaker:

Chris Polaschek

Chris Polaschek is the General Manager for Youth Justice at Child, Youth and Family/MSD. This role involves leadership for Youth Justice within the Service and the sector, developing operational policy and managing a variety of key Government projects, one of which is Fresh Start, which included developing a Military Activity Centre for serious young offenders. He is currently chair of the Youth Crime Action Plan Steering Group and also has responsibility for a CYF led project on Reinvigorating Family Group Conferences.

 

Chris has worked with juvenile and adult offenders in a wide variety of roles over the last 25 years including as a social worker, residential manager, prison manager and National Manager Youth Justice. He is a qualified social worker and has BA in sociology from Canterbury University.

Date:

Friday 24 April

12.30pm - 1.30pm

Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus, Level 5 Room RWW501, Railway West Wing

May

Domestic Violence in America:

A reconfigured legal response

Feminists fought hard for recognition that domestic violence was a crime and helped to conceive and build the civil and criminal justice response that now dominates the worldwide discourse on addressing domestic violence. But the decision to rely so heavily on the legal system as the primary systemic response to domestic violence in the United States has had serious unintended consequences for the men and women that come into contact with that system.

 

The legal system's response essentializes people subjected to abuse, utilizes overly restrictive definitions of domestic violence, inappropriately relies on separation to protect people subjected to abuse and restricts the autonomy of people subjected to abuse through the use of mandatory policies.

 

This talk will discuss those problems and imagine a reconfigured legal response to domestic violence.

Speaker:

Leigh Goodmark

Professor of Law, Francis King Carey School of Law, University of Maryland

Date:

Tuesday 5 May

5.30pm - 6.30pm

Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3), Rutherford House

Public Policy in the Sea:

Spatial Planning in the Hauraki Gulf

Public policy often struggles to effectively deal with complex issues involving multiple actors and regulatory agencies. In the environmental sphere, such situations are common, particularly when it comes to marine management.

 

The inadequacy of New Zealand's ocean governance arrangements has been recognised for well over a decade but progress to address this has been very slow. There have been more promising developments at a regional level, the most recent being the Seachange Tai Timu Tai Paru project currently underway in the Hauraki Gulf. This marine spatial planning project is breaking new ground in an endeavour to achieve a healthier marine environment that will deliver both public and private sector benefits.

 

Seachange has adopted a co-governance arrangement with half the representatives on the governance body comprising manawhenua. The process is also collaborative, with the statutory agencies handing over the role of developing the plan to an independently-chaired stakeholder working group. In addition, Seachange is embracing a fully integrated catchment-to-the-sea approach, addressing sediment and nutrient issues as well as the impacts and needs of activities such as fishing, aquaculture and tourism. The spatial plan (the first to be prepared in New Zealand) is well advanced and is due to be completed by June 2015.

 

This seminar will describe the current approach adopted in the Seachange project, its strengths and weaknesses, and applicability to broader marine management in New Zealand. It will also touch on institutional changes that may be required for the spatial plan to achieve its promise.

 

Raewyn Peart has published widely on coastal and marine governance issues and is currently a member of the Seachange Stakeholder Working Group.

Speaker:

Raewyn Peart

Policy Director for the Environmental Defence Society

Date:

Tuesday 12 May

5.30pm - 6.30pm

Victoria University of Wellington, Pipitea Campus Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3), Rutherford House

Later in 2015

Note: To view the public lectures given earlier in 2014; many with lecture reviews, power point slides and video recordings, see here.


There are plenty of free public lectures planned for the remainder of 2014. Please visit this site again soon or subscribe to our online newsletter to receive complimentary email updates.

Unfamiliar with Pipitea Campus? See here for an aerial view and a downloadable PDF map.