Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Previous Events 2012

14 December 2012
DOHA Decoded
DATE: Friday, 14th December 2012
VENUE: Pipitea Campus, Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)
TIME:12.30pm - 1.30pm

How did COP 18 advance international action on climate change and what does it mean for New Zealand? A seminar presentation by participants recently returned from the Doha climate change negotiations.

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Doha Decoded: COP 18 myths and realities
Adrian Macey IGPS, December 2012
View here

Doha Decoded: A Mixed Bag
Jo Tyndall; Climate Change Ambassador
View here

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11 December 2012
Recommended changes to handling of child poverty (5:57)
Added: 7:51AM - Tuesday December 11, 2012
Source: Breakfast

Breakfast asks Professor Jonathan Boston if the government is doing enough to combat child poverty.

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7 December 2012
Owning Adaptation in the Pacific Strengthening governance of climate adaptation finance - a seminar by Sarah Meads
DATE: Friday, 7th December 2012
VENUE: GBLT3
TIME: 12.30pm -1.30pm

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28 November 2012
Sound Bites and Stereotypes: What would it take to improve our public debate in New Zealand?
DATE: Wednesday,28th November 2012
VENUE: GBLT1
TIME: 6.00pm - 7.30pm
RSVP

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26 November 2012
Inaugural Sir Frank Holmes Memorial Lecture in Policy Studies

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1
Date: Monday, November 26, 2012
Time: 5:30 PM
Duration: 1:11:48
Link: Watch Sir Frank Holmes presentation
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21 November 2012
Lunchtime lecture on Solutions to Child Poverty - public Lecture by Professor Greg Duncan Distinguished Professor, University of California, Irvine
DATE:Wednesday, 21th November 2012
VENUE: Government Building Lecture Theatre 2, Lambton Quay
TIME: 12.30pm -1.30pm

View Professor Greg Duncan's PowerPoint presentation here.

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16 November 2012
Ombudsmen around the world: “Same but different”?
DATE: Friday,16th November 2012
VENUE: Railway Station room 501
TIME: 4.00pm - 6.00pm

RSVP

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14 November 2012
Civil Service Reform: the British Approach - seminar by Rt Hon Francis Maude, Minister for the Cabinet Office (UK)
DATE: Wedneday, 14th November 2012
VENUE:Lecture Theatre 1, Rutherford House
TIME: 12.30pm - 1.30pm

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13 November 2012

Helen Clark gives lecture on 'fit-for-purpose governance'

Former Prime Minister Helen Clark addressed a packed lecture theatre in the final of a series of talks on "Improving Global Governance", organised by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies.

A full transcript of Rt Hon Helen Clark's speech is available below, and a video link of her presentation is available here.

*Video link works best using Internet Explorer.

*Firefox and Google Chrome are currently not supported.

All PDF documents require Acrobat Reader.

Improving Global Governance: Making global institutions fit-for-purpose in the 21st century

Address by the Rt Hon Helen Clark for the Victoria University Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, Tuesday 13 November 2012

Victoria University Vice-Chancellor Pat Walsh introduced the Right Honourable Helen Clark, who is currently Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), saying that "there is surely no greater authority to speak on issues of governance than a former prime minister who now holds a very senior position in the United Nations".

"There is also, surely, no one less in need of an introduction in Wellington," he added.

The topic of Ms Clark's address was "Making global institutions fit-for-purpose in the 21st century", with commentary on current complex challenges and a focus on whether global governance institutions have kept up with geopolitical changes.

She talked about the perspective offered by her current role, saying that "at UNDP, we are acutely aware of how a crisis generated in the markets of the north spread to all corners of the earth, affecting the poorest and most distant nations".

Ms Clark cited numerous trans-border challenges requiring stepped up global responses, including financial stability, global warming, trade barriers, cyber-war and transnational crime, and the flow of refugees and other migrants.

"All these challenges tend to hit those who have the least power and voice to influence solutions the hardest." 

She reflected on how global governance institutions are performing, critiquing a number that are currently struggling to reach decisions.

"In some cases the reasons for paralysis, minimal outcomes, or failure to reach agreement are structural -- but also at play are the changing geopolitics of our times, as the relative power and economic balances change.

"Multilateralism needs goodwill and dialogue across groupings, but that is not always to be found in abundant quantities."

Drawing upon her insights into the mutilateral institutions and processes at the United Nations, Ms Clark discussed some successes and ongoing potential for reform in areas such as the Security Council and the Human Rights Council.

Turning her attention to the global financial crisis, she said the past four years have highlighted the absence of credible and strong global mechanisms for coordinated responses. Similar challenges are faced in the areas of sustainable development and climate change.

"This is a question of relevance and effectiveness. Fine words in outcome documents need to lead to action."

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13 November 2012
New Zealand National Integrity System Assessment
DATE: Tuesday,13th November 2012
VENUE: Victoria University, Rutherford House
TIME: 10.30am - 5.00pm

13th November 2012 Launch Celebration Day: Celebrating 100 Years of High Integrity Public Service While Leading Us Into The Future...

SPEAKERS Keynote Opening Address Lyn Provost - Auditor General Overseas Speaker Professor Andrew Goldsmith - Flinders University, Australia Keynote address Iain Rennie - State Services Commissioner Keynote Closing Address David Rutherford - Human Rights Commissioner TINZ Patron Rt Hon Sir Anand Satyanand.

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09 November 2012
Bringing Transparency to Political Lobbying in New Zealand
DATE: Friday, 9th November 2012
VENUE:Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3
TIME: 12.30pm - 1.30pm
All Welcome

Speaker: Holly Walker, MP Respondent: Dr Chris Eichbaum, School of Government

The Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Transparency International New Zealand are jointly sponsoring a series of seminars over the next six months on improving the quality of governance in New Zealand.

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02 November 2012
Public Compassion? Reflections on the Role of Compassion in Shaping Public Policy - seminar by Associate Professor Chris Marshall
DATE: Friday, 2nd November 2012
VENUE:Wellington Railway Station, Level 5, Room 501
TIME: 12.30pm - 1.30pm

All Welcome.

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01 November 2012
IGPS Roundtable on Climate Change Adaptation - Dr Adrian Macey
DATE: Thursday, 1st November 2012
VENUE: City Chambers, Wellington Town Hall
TIME: 9.00am - 1.00pm (followed by lunch)

A formal invitation and agenda will be sent in due course.

The first of two roundtables on Adaptation will be held at Wellington Town Hall, City Chambers on 1 November 2012. This will focus on local approaches, while the second Roundtable will focus more on International approaches including through the U.N.

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25 October 2012
Governance Swiss Style by Swiss Ambassador Marion Weichelt Krupski
DATE: Thursday, 25th October 2012
VENUE: Government Building Lecture Theatre 1 All welcome
TIME: 5.30pm to 6.30pm

How direct democracy in Switzerland promotes economic growth and strengthens society - a seminar presentation by Swiss Ambassador Marion Weichelt Krupski.

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25 October 2012
Our City a Backwater?
DATE: Thursday, 25th October 2012
VENUE: Rutherford House, Pipitea Campus, Victoria University (Bunny Street CDB)
TIME: 9.00am to 5.00pm

It's the 2012 Rotary Forum, in partnership with Victoria University

$55.00 per person (includes am and pm teas and lunch) - tickets transferable

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16 October 2012
The Last Ocean A film by New Zealand’s Peter Young and Fisheye Films
ALL WELCOME. NO CHARGE
DATE: Tuesday 16 October 2012
VENUE: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 2
TIME: 5:30pm -7:30pm

The film is 88 minutes long and will be followed by discussion.

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Seminar Tuesday 16 October 2012
Negatives in the Australian and New Zealand Policy of Floating (Wildly Fluctuating) Exchange Rates - a seminar presentation by Robin Pope
VENUE: Rutherford House Lecture Theatre Three
TIME: 12.30pm - 1.30pm
All welcome - no RSVP required
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Since commodity prices in Australia and New Zealand fluctuate wildly, old guard IMFers like Ken Rogoff find it praiseworthy that their central banks foster wild exchange rate swings. Such praise overlooks this policy's costs in the form of:

  1. exchange rate risk premia raising interest rates four to ten times above those in other developed countries;
  2. elimination of these countries' import-competing sectors, and planning hurdles for their high-tech innovating manufacturing exporters, that inefficiently distorts output to the low-skill, capital intensive, volatile commodities sector;
  3. firm bankruptcies;
  4. frequent arbitrary redistributions of wealth to overseas based lenders;
  5. frequent arbitrary windfall profits to commodities producers despite the fact that the long gestation lags in this multinational sector guarantee that these windfall profits have virtually zero aggregate demand benefits in either the short or medium term.

Any long term benefit is more than questionable in light of the utter unpredictability of exchange rates inside any policy relevant frame, and hence the inefficiency of enticing production based on unpredictable price relativities.

Wiser policy requires a fresh framework. The paper presents a new contradiction-free framework that can allow for these omitted effects.

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Seminar Friday 12 October 2012
Global Reassessment of the Economic & Human Impacts of Inaction on Climate Change - The importance of Climate Change impacts on Occupational Health - a seminar presentation by Tord Kjellstrom, Visiting Fellow, Professor, NCEPH, ANU
VENUE: SPECTRUM Theatre - BP House Corner Customhouse Quay & Johnston St (access off Johnston Street)
TIME: 12.30pm - 1.30pm

All welcome - no RSVP required

For the first time in a global assessment the economic and social damage likely to be caused by climate change impacts on labour productivity is highlighted. This component of climate change impacts is a major contributor to the economic costs.  Key parts of the underlying research was carried out by the NCEPH team at ANU, and this seminar will discuss this research in the context of the problems caused by increasing ambient heat exposures in workplaces around the world and the need to develop proactive adaptation methods also in countries like Australia.

Professor Tord Kjellstrom has more than 40 years experience in the academic field of environmental and occupational health epidemiology. He has during the last few years been active in carrying out research and assessments of climate change impacts on workplace health and productivity. He has held academic positions at the Karolinska Institute (Sweden), University of Auckland, University of Sydney, and is currently linked to Otago University Wellington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Australian National University, University College London (London) and Umea University (Sweden). He is the author or co-author of more than 400 publications. He worked at WHO, Geneva, for 12 years and was responsible, as Director of Global and Integrated Environmental Health, for the preparation of the first detailed analysis by WHO of the Human Health impacts of Climate Change in 1996 (this report was prepared by Tony McMichael and four other experts).

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Seminar Friday 5 October 2012
Carbon, Carbon Budgets, and Carbon Budget Deficits - a seminar presentation by Simon Terry
DATE: Friday, 05 October 2012
VENUE: Rutherford House Lecture Theatre 3
TIME: 12:30pm - 1:30pm

The ETS is in trouble and the future belongs to Carbon Budgeting This seminar will draw on the Sustainability Council's recent report, The Carbon Budget Deficit, and related work to examine future options. >

Read more...

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Seminar Series - August, September 2012
Improving International Governance
naiia logo

This series will involve senior politicians, academics and government officials and will address a range of important issues facing the global community. These include improving the governance of international organizations, the governance of global development, financial governance, environmental governance (especially climate change), the governance of natural resources, and Pacific governance.

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Seminar Thursday 13 September 2012
Global Governance of the Environment - a seminar by Dr Adrian Macey
You are invited to watch this Mediasite presentation: Seminar by Dr Adrian Macey.
Duration: 1:02:45
Global Governance of the Environment - a seminar by Dr Adrian Macey

Climate change and other global environmental challenges are stretching the capacity of the international community to cope with them. Why is this and what is to be done?

Dr Adrian Macey was New Zealand's first climate change ambassador; he chaired the Kyoto Protocol negotiations in 2011. He is currently Adjunct Professor in the School of Geography and Earth Sciences and a Senior Associate of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies at VUW.

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Seminar Thursday 27 September 2012
Governance of the Pacific - a seminar presentation by Graham Hassall
VENUE: Government Buildings Lecture Theatre Four
TIME: 5.30pm - 6.30pm
All welcome - no RSVP required

The Pacific region is home to some 20 micro-states, most of which are sovereign nations. This lecture will explore the extent to which the Pacific's "Regional Institutional Framework", during the present period of emergent globalism, serves the interests of Pacific societies.

Graham Hassall is Associate Professor in the School of Government and President of the United Nations Association of New Zealand.

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Workshop Wednesday 19 September 2012
Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand
VENUE: Civic Suite No 1, Wellington Town Hall
TIME: 9.00am – 4.00pm
Registration is free. To register email igps@vuw.ac.nz or call (04)4635307

Download the programme.

New Zealand has significant levels of child poverty which are having negative impacts on many children. Poverty also imposes substantial costs on the wider society, including considerable fiscal costs. In March 2012, the Children's Commissioner, Dr Russell Wills, established an Expert Advisory Group (EAG) on Solutions to Child Poverty. The EAG will publish its first report, an Issues and Options Paper, on 28 August, together with about 20 background papers on a raft of issues relating to child poverty. A final report will be completed by mid-December 2012.

Contributors include:

Professor Peter Saunders – Research Professor in Social Policy, Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales

Professor Jonathan Boston (Co-chair of the EAG) – Professor of Public Policy, School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington

Dr Tracey McIntosh (Co-chair of the EAG) – Senior Lecturer in Sociology, University of Auckland

Professor Philippa Howden-Chapman (Member of the EAG) – Professor of Public Health, University of Otago

Professor Richie Poulton (Member of the EAG) – Director, Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Research Unit; Co-Director, National Centre for Lifecourse Research, University of Otago

Bob Stephens (Member of the EAG) – Senior Associate, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, Victoria University of Wellington

Dr Nikki Turner (Member of the EAG) – General Practitioner, Director of Conectus and the Immunisation Advisory Centre, Senior Lecturer in the Division of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Auckland

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Workshop Friday 21 September 2012
Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand
VENUE: Fale Pacifica Wynyard St Auckland
TIME: 9.00am – 1.00pm
Registration is free. To register email igps@vuw.ac.nz or call (04)4635307

Download the programme.

New Zealand has significant levels of child poverty which are having negative impacts on many children. Poverty also imposes substantial costs on the wider society, including considerable fiscal costs. In March 2012, the Children's Commissioner, Dr Russell Wills, established an Expert Advisory Group (EAG) on Solutions to Child Poverty. The EAG will publish its first report, an Issues and Options Paper, on 28 August, together with about 20 background papers on a raft of issues relating to child poverty. A final report will be completed by mid-December 2012.

The Institute for Governance and Policy Studies in the School of Government at Victoria University of Wellington is hosting a one-day workshop to explore the policy options for reducing child poverty and mitigating its effects. Attendance is free.

The Workshop will include formal presentations and moderated discussions.

Contributors include:

Professor Peter Saunders – Research Professor in Social Policy, Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales

Professor Jonathan Boston (Co-chair of the EAG) – Professor of Public Policy, School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington

Dr Tracey McIntosh (Co-chair of the EAG) – Senior Lecturer in Sociology, University of Auckland

Professor Philippa Howden-Chapman (Member of the EAG) – Professor of Public Health, University of Otago

Dr Nikki Turner (Member of the EAG) – General Practitioner, Director of Conectus and the Immunisation Advisory Centre, Senior Lecturer in the Division of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Auckland

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Seminar Thursday 6 September 2012
New players, new challenges, new approaches for the governance of international development - a seminar presentation by Amanda Ellis - Deputy Secretary International Development Group, Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade

Amanda Ellis is the head of the New Zealand Aid Programme, leading 220 staff in New Zealand and offshore that manage over half a billion dollars of official development assistnace annually. Amanda's previous roles include Lead Specialist in Poverty Reduction at the World Bank Group, Senior Private Sector Development specialist at the International Finance Corporation and executive roles at Westpac Banking Corporation. She worked for the New Zealand Ministry Foreign Affairs and Trade from 1988-1998 in a range of foreign policy, economic and development roles, including a secondment at the OECD.

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Seminar Thursday 30 August 2012
IMF bailouts, G-20 resurgence, a confusing morass of Euro acronyms...who is in charge of fixing this mess? Lessons from the Global Financial Crisis for governance in the international financial sector - a seminar presentation by Dr Alan Bollard

IMF bailouts, G-20 resurgence, a confusing morass of Euro acronyms....who is in charge of fixing this mess? Alan Bollard drew on what we have learned from the Global Financial Crisis about governance in the international financial sector.

Dr Alan Bollard was appointed Governor of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand in September 2002. Previous positions include Secretary to the Treasury, Chairman of the New Zealand Commerce Commission and Director of the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research. Dr Bollard has also worked as an economist in a variety of positions in the United Kingdom and in the South Pacific, and has written a number of books on the New Zealand economy.

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Seminar Friday 24 August 2012
Covered bonds and bank failure management in New Zealand - a seminar presentation by David Tripe and Geoff Bertram

The global financial crisis of 2008 highlighted the question of where the costs fall when banks (or other financial institutions) fail, and the related issue of the moral hazard that arises whenever bank owners and managers are able to appropriate the gains from risk-taking while shifting costs onto other parties such as taxpayers or unsecured creditors.  Legislation currently before the New Zealand Parliament proposes to give greater certainty to purchasers of a new class of financial instruments, “covered bonds”, backed by priority claims on prime bank assets.  This is one of a number of innovations which can serve to undermine the principle that, in bank liquidation, the assets are available to be shared, thus minimising losses that depositors might suffer. At the same time, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand is proposing a scheme for “open bank resolution”, which is intended to try and reduce the disruption that might follow from the failure of a bank.  The seminar discussed these and other recent developments in the New Zealand financial sector and asks whether key lessons from the crisis of 2008 have been adequately taken into account by policymakers and regulators.

Associate Professor David Tripe is the Director of the Centre for Financial Services and Markets at Massey University. He has been teaching Banking at Massey since 1994 and is also Associate Head of the School of Economics and Finance. For much of the previous 20 years he was working in banks.  David has a PhD in Banking. His particular research interests include bank performance (including studies of efficiency and productivity), banking system oversight (with a particular emphasis on New Zealand), issues around the foreign ownership of the New Zealand banking system (and the systems of other countries with significant foreign ownership), and payment systems.

Geoff Bertram is a Senior Associate of the Institute of Governance and Policy Studies at Victoria University. He retired in 2009 after more than thirty years in the School of Economics and Finance. He has a D Phil in economics from the University of Oxford and a long history of commentary and publications on New Zealand economic issues. In July 2012 he appeared before the Select Committee on Finance and Expenditure to argue against the proposed covered-bonds legislation.

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Public Broadcasting – does it have a future in New Zealand?
A seminar series

Following the closure of TVNZ7 at the end of June, New Zealand is reported to be the only developed OECD country without a national public television service. Does this matter? What alternatives are there? This series of talks by specialist academics and a long-time contributor to public television aims to identify important governance and policy issues and advance debate about this fast changing sector.

Seminar Monday 27 August 2012
Is the Goodnight Kiwi about to say Goodbye? The uncertain future for public broadcasting service in New Zealand television - a seminar presentation by David Beatson

New Zealand adopted a unique model for the delivery of public broadcasting services when it prepared for the introduction of commercial competition in the television sector 23 years ago. Today broadcasting confronts even more significant challenges as the country enters the digital era of multi-national, multi-platform media competition. With the recent and rapid demise of the non-commercial TVNZ 6 and TVNZ 7 channels and Stratos, a nationwide channel operated on public broadcasting service principles, David Beatson explored the case for change.

David Beatson's career as a New Zealand broadcaster spans 48 years of the industry's history, initially with Compass, Gallery, Foreign Correspondent and Eyewitness News. He was an and producer of current affairs at TV2, and a founding director of Radio Pacific, New Zealand's first news-talk station and spent five years as editor of the New Zealand Listener, and six years as chairman of NZ On Air. He is now leading the Public Media Project in a campaign to secure a new television channel for public broadcasting services following the demise of TVNZ 6, TVNZ 7 and Stratos

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Seminar Friday 10 August 2012
New Zealand-Produced Programming and the Importance of TV Content Regulation - a seminar presentation by
Dr Trisha Dunleavy

VENUE: Railway Station West Wing Level 5, Room RW501
TIME: 12.30 p.m. – 1.30 p.m.

New Zealand’s minimally regulated environment for television content distribution means that the making of local programmes is increasingly vulnerable. This presentation will explain the different roles played by New Zealand on Air (NZoA), TVNZ, Mediaworks, Māori TV, and the now defunct TVNZ7. The ‘NZoA model’ remains highly effective in allocating public funding for local content production but aggressive competition for the rights to ‘new season’ imported material from Sky Television threatens to undermine the commercial viability for New Zealand’s most watched channels, TV One, TV2, and TV3.

Dr. Trisha Dunleavy is a Senior Lecturer in Media Studies at Victoria University of Wellington.

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Seminar Friday 3 August 2012
No Payment, No Piper, No Tune: The Political Economy of Funding Public Television in New Zealand - a seminar presentation by Dr Peter A. Thompson, Media Studies programme, Victoria University

Policy tensions between the Treasury and Ministry for Culture and Heritage resulted in contradictory funding arrangements whereby TVNZ was allocated money by one branch of government only for it to be taken back by another. Between 1999 and 2008, three Labour-led governments attempted to revitalize public service television by restructuring of TVNZ as Crown company with a public charter and introducing TVNZ 6 and 7. The election of a National-led government in 2008 saw the TVNZ Charter funding reallocated to NZ on Air, revoking of the Charter and closure of TVNZ 6 and 7. To what extent did institutional arrangements and policy assumptions contribute to these changes?

Peter Thompson is a Senior Lecturer in the media studies programme at Victoria University.

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Seminar Thursday 2 August 2012
Developing a policy tool for the early life course - a seminar presentation by Dr Peter Davis, University of Auckland

Dr Davis's team is developing a simulation model of the early life course drawing on information from an existing longitudinal study (the Christchurch Health and Development Study). In essence we are building a "virtual" cohort that uses data from a real cohort to establish a base file for the model, to estimate statistical equations for building that model, and to serve as a benchmark for assessing its accuracy. This virtual cohort can then be interrogated with policy-relevant "what if" questions by varying key parameters and running the simulation. This seminar presented some information on the construction and validation of the model, canvassed interactions with a user-group, including the testing of policy scenarios, and looked forward to future developments in enriching model construction with a wider set of longitudinal data, including Maori and Pacific populations.

Dr Peter Davis is Professor of the Sociology of Health and Well-Being and Director of the COMPASS research centre at the University of Auckland.

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Seminar Tuesday 12 June 2012
Competing Indices of happiness: will the best one win?- a seminar presentation
by Paul Frijters, University of Queensland

Happiness is in an industrial boom phase: populations want it, politicians promise it, and statisticians measure it. But what is it and what is the main finding sofar? As with any boom phase, there are many competing measures of happiness on offer reflecting the wares of different statisticians: mood or reflection? Happiness or satisfaction? Well-being or welfare? Day Reconstruction Measure or Qualy? Composite index or single-item measure? Survey or blood pressure? The options arising from the world of measurement are many. The talk gave a brief outline of the frontier in the economics of happiness field, discussed a variety of new indices of happiness, and noted the most important lessons so far: life does offer second chances and happiness to a large degree comes from relative positions.

Paul Frijters is a Professor of Economics at the University of Queensland and an adjunct professor at the Australian National University's Research School of Economics. He has been with ANU since 2003 and UQ since 2010.

He is also a Research Director of the Rumici Project. The project monitors rural to urban migration in China and Indonesia.

Paul holds a Ph.D. on welfare and well-being in Russia from the University of Amsterdam. The thesis applies and extends psychological insights about the causes, definition and measurement of well-being into economics. He has a wide range of research interests, specialising in happiness, labour market, health economics and econometrics. His recent research into rural-urban migration in China produced new evidence and a prediction that China would be the largest economy in the world within the next 10 years.

In 2009, Paul was awarded the Economic Society of Australia's Young Economist Award. Paul is also a contributor to the Core and ClubTroppo blogs.

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Seminar Friday 8 June 2012
The future for Wellington and local government reform - a seminar presentation by
Her Worship, the Mayor of Wellington, Celia Wade-Brown

The nature and structure of local government is facing a perfect storm for change: growing pressure on financial stability, significant infrastructure needs to respond to earthquake risk and rising sea level, and the evolution of an informed public are but three factors driving potential change in local government. Using central government's 'Better Local Government' reform package for context, Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown explored the implications for the Wellington region and asked, at what point does the drive for large-scale efficiencies begin to have a greater cost for local representation?

Celia Wade-Brown grew up in London and spent a year working abroad in West Africa, before embarking on a career in IT programming, consultancy and teaching. Arriving in Wellington 1983, Celia served as a Wellington City Councillor from 1994 and was elected Mayor in 2010 on a platform of community engagement, clean technology development and good transport policies.

Her vision for Wellington focuses on making the most of all our resources: great infrastructure, beautiful natural environment, compact city centre and suburban villages, and our inclusive and creative population – making sure Wellington stays a great place to live, work and visit.

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Seminar Friday 1 June 2012
Better Public Services - Continuous Improvement or Continuous Restructuring - a seminar presentation by Tom Schneider, President, CEO and Founder of Restructuring Associates Inc

The government's focus on Better Public Services includes the need for government agencies to focus on continuous improvement in a time of fiscal constraint.  Dr Schneider provided a refreshing view and sound advice on achieving high performance organisations while managing change. 

Dr Tom Schneider is the President, CEO and Founder of Restructuring Associates Inc in Washington DC.  A former advisor to US Government Departments, he is a member of the Boards of the J, Craig Venter Institute, the Florey Neuroscience Institutes, the National Underground Railway Freedom Centre, the Citizens Development Corps and the American Australian Educational Leadership Foundation.

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Seminar Friday 25 May 2012
The future youth want - outcomes from national consultations with Youth on Rio+20 and sustainable development - a seminar presentation by speakers from UNICEF

World leaders are meeting in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil in June to consider the best pathways to making a safer, more equitable, cleaner, greener and more prosperous world for all.
Here in New Zealand, young people have been disconnected from these discussions and decision-making about what kind of a future they want to see. UNICEF NZ, in partnership with the NZ National Commission for UNESCO, and 350 Aotearoa, Generation Zero, Global Poverty Project, P3, and UN Youth New Zealand have hosted consultations with young people around the country in the lead up to Rio+20, in an effort to find out what young people think about sustainable development issues and what we should do about them.

An outcome document from these consultations is being shared with the NZ Government and at international forums like the World Youth Congress and the Major Group for Children and Youth in the lead up to Rio+20.

This seminar shared the outcomes of the consultations and looked at what young New Zealanders expect of the future, and whether that matches what they actually want.

The NZ NGO Rio+20 Platform was formed in 2011 “To establish an inclusive NGO platform as the collective voice to work with all relevant NGOs and the NZ Government in preparation for Rio+20”. See www.angoa.org.nz/

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Seminar Friday 18 May 2012
Measures for the Future we Want - contributions to Rio+20 - a seminar presentation by the New Zealand NGO Rio+20 Platform

Rio+20, the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development to be held in Rio de Janeiro mid-June, marks 20 years since the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) and Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. This Conference will focus on two themes: (a) a green economy in the context of sustainable development poverty eradication; and (b) the institutional framework for sustainable development for "The Future we Want".

The New Zealand NGO Rio+20 Platform is a coalition of national non-governmental and civil society organisations working together on input and sharing information in the lead-up to this conference.

In this, the first of two seminars hosted by IPS, the RIO+20 Platform considered development of indicators or measures of "The Future we Want". The Rio+20 draft outcomes document 'recognises the limitation of GDP' and pushes for developing indicators that 'complement GDP' requesting the 'Secretary General establish a process of consultation' on this. This paragraph in the section on Accelerating and Measuring Progress, as the entire Zero Draft document, is under international discussion.

Two speakers shared perspectives on what we need to consider in finding alternatives to GDP and sustainable development indicators.

Sarah Meads (Oxfam New Zealand) will discuss humanity's challenge in the 21st century to eradicate poverty and achieve prosperity for all within the means of the planet's limited natural resources. In the run-up to Rio+20, Oxfam has presented its ideas in a discussion paper, A safe and just space
for humanity- Can we live within the doughnut? which identifies the essential framework for sustainable development and its measurement. Sarah will present key aspects of this approach.

Download Sarah Mead's presentation here

Download the Oxfam discussion paper A safe and just space for humanity CAN WE LIVE WITHIN THE DOUGHNUT? by Kate Raworth here

Rachael Milicich (Statistics New Zealand) will be discussing her work in the Official Statistics Forum measuring New Zealand prosperity using a sustainable development approach, and how New Zealand is progressing in adopting alternatives to GDP.

Download Rachael Milicich's presentation here

The NZ NGO Rio+20 Platform was formed in 2011 “To establish an inclusive NGO platform as the collective voice to work with all relevant NGOs and the NZ Government in preparation for Rio+20”. See www.angoa.org.nz/

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Better Public Services: From Practice to Theory - and back again - a seminar presentation by Bill Ryan, School of Government, Victoria University

Compared with some recent reports elsewhere (e.g. Australia, Britain), the 'Better Public Services' Advisory Group Report appears to be driven more by selected practical learnings than theory or some overarching vision.

At a deeper level, several aspects of the report are consistent with certain key ideas emerging in public management (e.g. networked governance; an outcomes orientation). Whilst not constituting a whole 'theory' even at the applied level, these aspects of the report do represent 'practical theorising' and point to some of the key directions in which practice in New Zealand must head. What should be noted, however, is that these signal significantly different ways of conducting public management. In that respect, they are welcome and should be taken seriously. However, they should not simply be plastered over the top of what already exists. Some aspects of current practice will need to be explicitly altered or repudiated for them to work.

Whether Better Public Services proves to be influential and durable depends on how effectively it is implemented - rather, whether the principles underpinning the report are made to permeate throughout the public sector and become the basis on which new forms of practice are created. The report itself offers only a few pointers in this regard. This seminar identified some things that must be done to enable emergent implementation, discussing possibilities that should be pursued and constraints to be removed before this can occur.

Bill Ryan is an Associate Professor in the School of Government at Victoria University. Bill has been involved in various ways in public sector reform in Australia and New Zealand for more than 20 years and is a co-editor of and contributor to the recent book Future State: Directions for Public Management in New Zealand (Victoria University Press, 2011)

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Seminar Wednesday 9 May 2012
Green Growth or greening growth? - a seminar presentation by Phil O'Reilly, Chief Executive of Business NZ

Phil O'Reilly is Chief Executive of Business NZ, New Zealand's largest business advocacy group, representing thousands of businesses of all sizes.

Internationally, Mr. O'Reilly represents New Zealand employers at the International Labour Organisation, contributes to the governing body of the ILO, and is a Board member of the Business and Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD.

Nationally, he chairs the Government's Green Growth Advisory Group, the Capitalising on Research & Development Action Group and the Redundancy & Employment Transition Advisory Group, and is joint chair of the New Zealand Workplace Health & Safety Council and board member of the Innovation Board of the Ministry of Science & Innovation and the Council of the Royal Society of NZ. He serves on a number of other Ministerial and advisory groups.

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Seminar Friday 4 May 2012
Planning for the Impacts of Marine Commercial Vessels on Marine Ecosystems
- a seminar presentation by Dr Michael Vincent McGinnis


Our dependence on marine commercial vessels to transport goods and resources across the world's ocean is well known. Yet, we have underestimated the ecological consequences of this dependence on coastal and marine systems. In many ways, the impacts associated with marine commercial vessels represent a primary risk to island countries, maritime communities, and sensitive coastal and marine areas. These impacts should be carefully considered in future marine planning and decision-making. The presentation provided an overview of examples of these impacts and risks from marine commercial vessels, and described the various policy and planning responses to these pressures, including the use of marine zoning strategies. 

Dr Michael Vincent McGinnis received a PhD in Political Science in 1993. He is an Associate Professor in International Marine Policy and Science at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and the National Center for the Blue Economy in California, USA. He is also a Senior Associate of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies in the School of Government at Victoria University of Wellington. He recently completed a study on New Zealand's marine governance framework funded by the Emerging Issues Program.

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Seminar Friday 27 April 2012
'Thinking, Fast and Slow' and the architecture for a new theory of health behaviour -
a seminar presentation by Jaikishan Desai,
Deputy Director, Health Services Research Centre, Victoria University

Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman’s new book Thinking, Fast and Slow is a fascinating summary of recent research on decision-making and judgement, and provides an appropriate framework for re-thinking how individuals make decisions about their health.  Some re-thinking is required because while self-management of health is critical to public policy aimed at improving health outcomes, the underlying behaviour is poorly understood.  As a result much of health reform tends to be aimed at reconfiguring the delivery of health services - a “build it and they will come” approach - which is inefficient in the use of limited resources.  This talk summarized the main findings of Kahneman’s book and elaborated on how these insights factor into Dr Desai's own ongoing theoretical research on health behaviour. 

Dr Jaikishan Desai is an economist/demographer/biostatistician by training but a non-disciplinary, social scientist in practice.  He is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Government at Victoria University and the Deputy Director of the Health Services Research Centre since November 2009.  His current research encompasses theoretical work on health behaviour and econometric analyses of health, poverty, gender, and violence in various countries (New Zealand, India, Vietnam, and Mexico). 

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Conference Wednesday 18 April 2012
Conference on the Funding of Student Finance - Rutherford House, Wellington

Evaluating the Current New Zealand Policy Framework:
Evidence, Issues and Perspectives

James Hyatt, Julie Keenan and Roger Smyth (Ministry of Education) – Assessing the current student loan scheme

Professor Stuart McCutcheon (University of Auckland) – Perspectives on student finance

James Zuccollo (New Zealand Institute of Economic Research) and Associate Professor Sholeh Maani (University of Auckland) – Private returns to tertiary education: How does New Zealand compare?

Download James Zuccollo's presentation here

Download Sholeh Maani's presentation here

Download the Mediasite presentation: Student Finance Conference Part 1
Duration: 1:51:57
Link:
http://mdsweb.vuw.ac.nz/Mediasite/Viewer/?peid=66704e5b534a4c479eb387d57b3ecd56


Lessons from Other Countries
Professor Richard James (Melbourne University) – The Australian tertiary funding and regulatory framework: lessons for New Zealand

Professor Bruce Chapman (Australian National University) – Income-contingent loans schemes: conceptual issues and international comparative lessons

Download the Mediasite presentation: Student Finance Conference Part  2
Duration: 1:42:50
Link:
http://mdsweb.vuw.ac.nz/Mediasite/Viewer/?peid=9483479fc93443d0b6a672be50c754ac


Other Perspectives and Issues
Arena Williams, Andreas Triandafilidas and Dr Laura Dimock – Student perspectives and survey data

Download Arena Williams's presentation here

Download Laura Dimock's presentation here

Roger Smyth (Ministry of Education) and Richard Owen (Inland Revenue Department) – Evidence on overseas borrowers

Download Roger Smyth's presentation here

Download Richard Owen's presentation here

Professor Richie Poulton (University of Otago) – Evidence from the NZ Graduate Longitudinal Study (GLSNZ)

Download the Mediasite presentation: Student Finance Conference Part 3 
Duration: 2:13:41
Link:
http://mdsweb.vuw.ac.nz/Mediasite/Viewer/?peid=2b8bba24207846e495be66d1c6cc4775

The Policy Options for Student Finance: Contrasting Perspectives
Norman LaRocque (Asian Development Bank)

Download Norman LaRocque's presentation here

Associate Professor Susan St John (University of Auckland)

Download Susan St John's presentation here

Download the Mediasite presentation: Student Finance Conference Part 4 
Duration: 1:41:38
Link:
http://mdsweb.vuw.ac.nz/Mediasite/Viewer/?peid=bf6bfa0e97dd4123aa247e111758f24b

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Seminar Friday 13 April 2012
Paths not taken in electricity restructuring: alternatives to the asset sale programme
-a seminar presentation by Geoff Bertram, Senior Associate, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

As the three state-owned electricity companies are moved towards privatisation, this seminar looked back over the past three decades of electricity sector restructuring and deregulation, and reviewed a number of ideas which have been set aside by successive governments, but which are likely to re-surface as potential buyers carry out due diligence on the companies and the potential regulatory and policy risks they may encounter in future.

Geoff Bertram was until 2009 a Senior Lecturer in Economics at Victoria University.  Since his retirement he has been Senior Associate at the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Adjunct Researcher at the Climate Change Research Institute. His research interests include regulation of public utility industries such as electricity, gas and telecommunications, and he has published extensively on the issues surrounding electricity sector regulation in New Zealand.

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Workshop Friday 30 March 2012
Ethics at Work: Challenges and opportunities in working ethically in the public, corporate, professional and voluntary sectors - a workshop led by
Simon Longstaff of St James Ethics Centre, Sydney

Sponsored by IPS, School of Government at VUW, the Wellington Cathedral of St Paul,
St Peter's on Willis and ‘Faith in the City’

In the first part of the workshop, Dr Longstaff provided an overview of the challenges and opportunities in organisational ethics, supplemented by insights from the local Wellington and New Zealand scene. In the second part, he offered a framework for the implementation or further development of ethical practice in participants’ own organizations. He sees good leadership as defining a culture of 'common intent' rather than mere compliance.

Simon Longstaff’s distinguished career includes being named as one of ‘True Leaders’ for the 21st century by the Australian Financial Review’s ‘Boss’ magazine noting "I don’t know one CEO or chairman in corporate Australia who has not worked with Simon Longstaff".
Dr Longstaff has a PhD in Philosophy from Cambridge University. Prior to becoming the inaugural Executive Director of St James Ethics Centre in 1991, he worked in the Northern Territory in the Safety Department of a BHP subsidiary, lectured at Cambridge University and consulted to the Cambridge Commonwealth and Overseas Trusts.

Read more about the work of St James Ethics Centre at http://www.ethics.org.au/

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Seminar Friday 30 March 2012
The Practice of Ethics in the Public and Private Sectors: A Case of Constructive Subversion - a seminar presentation by Simon Longstaff of St James Ethics Centre, Sydney

hosted in association with Wellington Cathedral of St Paul, St Peter's on Willis and
‘Faith in the City’

Drawing on mainstream Western philosophical traditions, Dr Longstaff provided an introduction to ethics as being both 'the architecture of choice' and the source of 'organizational DNA'. This introduction involved a clarification of the distinct roles played by values and principles and be located In a wider discussion of what constitutes effective (ethical) leadership and the role of such leadership in defining a culture of 'common intent' rather than mere compliance.

Simon Longstaff has a PhD in Philosophy from Cambridge. Prior to becoming the inaugural Executive Director of St James Ethics Centre in 1991, he worked in the Northern Territory in the Safety Department of BHP subsidiary, lectured at Cambridge University and consulted to the Cambridge Commonwealth and Overseas Trusts.

His book Hard Cases, Tough Choices was published in 1997.

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Seminar Monday 26 March 2012
Unilateral climate policy in Europe - competitiveness concerns and policy options
-
a seminar presentation by Andreas Loeschel, University of Heidelberg

Competitiveness issues have been a central concern in the design of climate policy in Europe, especially in Phase 3 of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme. The presentation discussed the implications of unilateral climate policy for competitiveness and carbon leakage. It also looked at different policy options proposed to address these issues, especialle border carbon adjustments.

Andreas Loeschel is head of the Environmental and Resource Economics Research Department at the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW) and Professor of Economics at the University of Heidelberg. Since 2011, he has chaired the government's Energy Expert Commission to monitor energy transformation in Germany. He is Lead Author in the Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report.

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Seminar Wednesday 21 March 2012
A Bolt from the Blue: examining the National Government changes to the NZ aid programme in 2009 and what they mean now - a seminar presentation by Jo Spratt of NZADDs

Jo Spratt is the Coordinator for NZADDs. She currently works as a consultant in the Pacific. She has a background as a nurse, followed by Director roles with Family Planning's international unit - Family Planning International, and in Fiji with the Sub-Regional Office of the Pacific for International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). Jo has qualifications in nursing, political science, development, public health and NGO management. Her areas of interest include public policy, aid, development, health, women's rights, and organisational change and management.

Seminar presented in association with NZADDS (New Zealand Aid and Development Dialogues). NZADDs is an independent think tank devoted to expanding analysis, discussion and understanding of NZ aid and development work. www.nzadds.org.nz

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Seminar Friday 16 March 2012
International Dimensions to Poverty among Families with Dependent Children- a seminar presentation by Bob Stephens

The seminar showed how income poverty rates differ between OECD countries. It then investigated why these child income poverty rates differ, considering factors such as public spending on family assistance, degree of income inequality, incidence of lone parenting, employment rates, and effectiveness of government tax and benefit policies to reduce income poverty. The paper drew upon OECD data, statistics from the New Zealand Poverty Measurement project and MSD, and a recent cross-country study on the relative generosity of family assistance.

Bob Stephens is a Senior Research Associate in the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, having recently retired from being an Associate Professor within the School of Government. He is a founding member of the New Zealand Poverty Measurement Project. The seminar draws upon an article written in Children, for the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, Summer, 2011, No. 79.

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Seminar Friday 9 March 2012
Why does New Zealand have high real interest rates, does it matter and, if so, what can be done about it? - a seminar presentation by Dennis Rose

Countries with high net international liabilities generally have high real interest rates.
Similar patterns exist with respect to net domestic liabilities. National interest rate differentials are underpinned by the evolving pattern of world interest rates, reflecting changes in world productivity levels and international monetary aggregates. New Zealand's high real interest rates add to the cost of debt servicing and inhibit investment and growth. Escape from this situation requires policies that secure better balance between incomes and expenditure and better balance of payments outcomes. Export growth is thus a key determinant of economic welfare.

Dennis Rose is a research economist and senior associate at the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. Recent work has focused on linkages between national debt levels and national rates of interest. He is also interested in the discount rate to be used in assessing infrastructural investment and other long-term outcomes such as climate change. He has longstanding interests in policies directed to sustaining high levels of employment at high incomes. Fundamental to these is a focus on the structural development of the New Zealand economy.

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Seminar Friday 2 March 2012
Red Tape, Better Regulation and the Regulatory State: The most recent reform agenda in Europe - a seminar presentation by Werner Jann, Potsdam University


In recent years 'better regulation' has become the most visible, and possibly the most successful public sector reform agenda in most European countries. This presentation gave a brief overview of how and why the reform agenda gained prominence, how successful it has been, and how this success can be explained. The seminar also discussed how this reform relates to earlier reform paradigms and whether 'the regulatory state' could be the dominating concept of the modern state in this decade.

Werner Jann is Professor for Political Science, Administration and Organization at the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences at Potsdam University. After his academic education and post-doctoral work at Universities in Berlin, Edinburgh, Speyer and Berkeley, he worked as Head of the Think-Tank Schleswig-Holstein (Denkfabrik Schleswig-Holstein) in the Prime-Ministers Office of the Land Schleswig-Holstein in Kiel from 1989 - 1993. He was President of the European Group of Public Administration (EGPA) from 2001 to 2004 and is a member of several national and international reform commissions.

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Seminar Thursday 23 February 2012
Public Policy and the Price of Happiness: the use of subjective measures of well-being to inform policy - a seminar presentation by Conal Smith of the OECD

The presentation summarises what is known about the degree to which subjective measures of well-being are amenable to policy change, both at an individual and national aggregate level. Evidence is presented from the Gallup World Poll on the impact of policy on subjective well-being, and there is a discussion of the implications of the use of measures of subjective well-being for monitoring well-being and in cost-benefit analysis of non-market outcomes.

Conal Smith currently works for the OECD statistics directorate, leading work on the development of international guidelines on the measurement of subjective well-being. He previously managed the Social Conditions group in Statistics New Zealand, where he oversaw the release of the first New Zealand General Social Survey. Before this worked as a manager in the Strategic Social Policy Group in the Ministry of Social Development where he was responsible for the production of the Social Report.

Download the presentation here
Duration: 00:56:18

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Seminar Friday 17 February 2012
Climate Change: the Durban deal. Views from inside the negotiations - a seminar presentation led by Dr Adrian Macey with participation by members of the New Zealand negotiating team at Durban

New Zealand had a prominent role at the Conference of the Parties in Durban late last year, both in brokering solutions and coming up with ideas.  The seminar will discuss the Durban results, and assess the prospects of the international negotiations up to 2020, including the issues of most interest to New Zealand.

Adrian Macey was New Zealand's first climate change ambassador from 2006-2010, and has wide experience of multilateral negotiations, including the Uruguay and Doha rounds of the GATT/WTO. In 2011 he was the Chair of the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. He is a Senior Associate of the Institute of Policy Studies, School of Government, Victoria University.

Download the presentation here
Duration: 1:04:18